New Hampshire Real Estate

Welcome to the America Real Estate Directory

New Hampshire is bordered on the north by the Canadian province of Qu├ębec, on the east by Maine and the Atlantic Ocean, on the south by Massachusetts, and on the west by Vermont. New Hampshire main industries are tourism, manufacturing, agriculture, trade, and mining. The most important industrial products are electrical and other machinery, textiles, pulp and paper products, and stone and clay products. A 2012 real estate survey has estimated the population of New Hampshire at 1,318,194.

Amherst click here

Bedford click here

Brookline

Nancy Caron
Nancy Caron Realty
Phone: 603-883-1875
E-mail: nancy@yourownhome.com
Web Site
If your looking for a home in So. New Hampshire be sure to visit our website! View all the homes listed in our local MLS. Research schools, find a job, send for a FREE, no-obligation relocation package and much more.

Concord

    Michelle Gilbert
    Better Homes & Gardens RE, The Masiello Group
    Mobile: (603) 244-8781
    Office: (603) 228-0151 Ext. 3027

    Judith Hampe
    Coldwell Banker J Hampe Associates
    Office:(603) 224-4422

    Kathy Ahlin
    Great Beginnings
    Office:(603) 856-7169

    Maria Laycox
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office: (603) 223-6542

    Greg McLeod
    BH&G REAL ESTATE/The Masiello Group
    Office: (603) 715-3034

    Helen Swasey
    Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate The Masiello Group
    Office: (603) 228-0151

    Diana and Robert Wiita
    Better Homes & Gardens/The Masiello Group
    Mobile: (603)344-4300
    Office: (603) 228-0151 Ext. 19

    David Minton
    Village House Realty
    Office:(603) 224-1100

    Cynthia Marple
    Cynthia Marple, Real Estate Broker
    Office: (603) 228-9002

    Barbara Dimond
    Village House Realty
    Office:(603) 224-1100

Derry

    Chagnon, Joan
    The Bean Group
    Office: (603) 434-4044

    Catherine Smothermon
    Summerview Real Estate, LLC
    Office:(603) 432-5453

    Cable Horan
    Summerview Real Estate, LLC
    Office:(603) 432-5453

    Bruce Baker
    Bean Group, LLC
    Office:(603) 434-4404

    Brian Markow
    Summerview Real Estate, LLC
    Office:(603) 432-5453

    Brian Wood
    Century 21 Northshore
    Office:(603) 434-5400

    Brenda Brophy
    Century 21 Northshore
    Office:(603) 434-5400

    Ashley Thibeault
    American Eagle Realty
    Office:(603) 437-0110

    Amie M. Chick
    Summerview Real Estate, LLC
    Office:(603) 432-5453

    Mary Jo Gilloon
    American Eagle Realty
    Office: (603) 437-0110

Dover

    David Paolini
    C21/ Central Falls Realty
    Office:(603) 749-6590

    Deb Bamford
    Bean Group
    Office:(603) 766-1980

    Bandouveres, Jeanette
    Better Homes & Gardens The Masiello Group
    Mobile: (603) 557-7089

    Amy Fontaine
    Winsor Brook Property Advisors
    Office:(603) 750-7501

    Amanda Libby-Rowell
    Coldwell Banker Peggy Carter Team
    Office: (603)742-4663

    Walter Fischer
    Fischer Agency
    Office:(603) 742-6242

    Stephanie McAdams
    Bean Group / Dover
    Mobile: (603) 512-2840
    Office: (603)766-1980

    Stephen Doherty
    RE/MAX Legacy
    Office:(603) 742-7117

    Scott Smith
    Winsor Brook Property Advisors
    Office:(603) 750-7501

    Rudolph, Mary Beth
    The Masiello Group/Dover
    Office: (603) 749-4800

Hollis click here

Hudson

Nancy Caron
Nancy Caron Realty
Phone: 603-883-1875
E-mail: nancy@yourownhome.com
Web Site
If your looking for a home in So. New Hampshire be sure to visit our website! View all the homes listed in our local MLS. Research schools, find a job, send for a FREE, no-obligation relocation package and much more.

Litchfield

Nancy Caron
Nancy Caron Realty
Phone: (603) 883-1875
E-mail: nancy@yourownhome.com
Web Site
If your looking for a home in So. New Hampshire be sure to visit our website! View all the homes listed in our local MLS. Research schools, find a job, send for a FREE, no-obligation relocation package and much more.

Londonderry

    Pat Demarais
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Mobile: (603) 548-8282

    Kathy Bertani
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Mobile: (781) 727-1771

    Jong Mi Edinger
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office: (603) 845-2138
    Mobile: (603) 493-9379

    Joshua Naughton
    Innovative Realty
    Office: (603) 434-4101 Ext. 210

    John MacGilvary
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office: (603) 845-2201

    Claudia Charbonneau Dodds
    RE/MAX 1st Choice
    Office: (603) 425-2400 Ext. 135
    Mobile: (603) 425-4532

    Angela Poitras
    Domain Real Estate
    Office:(603) 437-3773

    Arlene Hajjar
    RE/MAX 1st Choice
    Mobile: (603) 490-1001

    KIM WELLS
    PRUDENTIAL VERANI REALTY
    Office: (603) 845-2130

Manchester click here

Manchester is located in southern New Hampshire on the Merrimack River, at Amoskeag Falls. Manchester is the largest city in the state and a regional financial, distribution, and industrial center.

Merrimack click here

Merrimack is a one hour commute from Boston.

Milford

Nancy Caron
Nancy Caron Realty
Phone: 603-883-1875
E-mail: nancy@yourownhome.com
Web Site
If your looking for a home in So. New Hampshire be sure to visit our website! View all the homes listed in our local MLS. Research schools, find a job, send for a FREE, no-obligation relocation package and much more.

Mont Vernon

Nancy Caron
Nancy Caron Realty
Phone: 603-883-1875
E-mail: nancy@yourownhome.com
Web Site
If your looking for a home in So. New Hampshire be sure to visit our website! View all the homes listed in our local MLS. Research schools, find a job, send for a FREE, no-obligation relocation package and much more.

Nashua click here

Rochester

    Helen Williams
    White Star Real Estate
    Office:(603) 335-6699

    Cathie Cox
    Avalar Advantage Real Estate
    Mobile: (603)781-4748

    Charles Alty
    Better Homes & Gardens The Masiello Group
    Office: (603) 749-4800

    Bob Watson
    Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate
    Office: (603) 335-4663

    Betty Wolters
    RE/MAX Realty Centre of Roches
    Office:(603) 332-2323

    Barbara Godin
    Key Source Real Estate
    Office:(603) 335-0700

    Barbara Henderson
    Hourihane Cormier & Assoc
    Office:(603) 332-9500

    Barbara Myers
    Hourihane - Cormier ASSC
    Mobile: (207) 432-6631
    Office: (603) 332-9500 Ext. 117

    Ann Richards
    Hourihane Cormier & Assoc
    Office:(603) 332-9500

Salem

    Kimberlee Tretola-Bouchard
    Century 21 Northshore
    Office:(603) 893-8230

    Jody DeCarolis
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office: (603) 870-4947

    Jennifer O'Hanley
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office:(603) 893-7999

    Jennifer Oliveri
    Century 21 Northshore
    Office:(603) 893-8230

    Jill O Shaughnessy
    Coco, Early
    Mobile: (603) 275-0487
    Office: (603) 890-3226

    Jeni-Lyn Freda
    McGinn & Associates Realty LLC
    Office:(603) 898-3900

    Ellen Grant
    Coco, Early
    Office: (603) 890-3226 Ext. 122

    Ellen Carter
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office:(603) 893-7999

    Elizabeth Palardy
    Coco, Early & Associates
    Office:(603) 890-3226

    Donna Markie
    Prudential Verani Realty
    Office:(603) 893-7999

More about New Hampshire

Because of poor soil, a short growing season, and competition from more fertile regions, much of New Hampshire's former farmland has returned to forest land. Most farms are in the Connecticut and Merrimack river valleys and the coastal lowlands.

New Hampshire's dairy industry is concerned primarily with the production of fresh milk, both for local consumption and for shipment to Massachusetts markets. Because of their high productivity, New Hampshire's dairy cattle are also sold, in embryo form, as breeding stock throughout the world. Other livestock raised, particularly as a sideline by dairy farmers, include beef cattle and hogs. Fresh eggs for market are the most valuable poultry product. Chickens, cattle and calves, and turkeys are also sold. New Hampshire farms derive 59 percent of their income from the sale of livestock and livestock products.

The chief commercial crops raised in New Hampshire are greenhouse and nursery products, Christmas trees, and apples. In addition, various vegetables and forest products are sources of agricultural income. Specialized nurseries, growing forest seedlings and flowers for the Boston and New York City markets, are scattered throughout the state. Hay grown to feed livestock is the chief field crop, and the leading vegetable produced is sweet corn. Lumber cut from farm woodlots is sold. Many farmers supplement their income by tapping the maple trees on their lands to produce maple syrup and maple sugar.

The products of the forest were of major importance to the regional economy during the colonial period, when New Hampshire timber produced masts for British navy warships. Later, many of the familiar Yankee clipper ships and the Concord stagecoaches used on the American frontier were built with New Hampshire lumber. In recent years the local supply of timber has gone into the manufacture of pulp and paper products, railroad ties, furniture, and fence posts. The manufacture of these forest products provided 9,300 jobs in 1997.

Most of the commercial forest land is privately owned. Individual holdings are generally small, mostly less than about 80 hectares (about 200 acres). Some of these holdings were formerly unprofitable farmlands. More than two-thirds of the timber consists of softwoods, including pine, spruce, fir, and hemlock. In order to discourage indiscriminate cutting on private land, the state collects no tax on timber until after it is cut.

Fishing plays only a minor part in the state's economy, with a catch worth $12.5 million in 1999. A small fishing fleet, based at Portsmouth, brings in a catch of flounders and smelt. In addition, lobsters, shrimp, and crabs are caught in the coastal waters.

Although New Hampshire is known as the Granite State, the production of granite and other minerals is a relatively minor part of the state's economy. New Hampshire ranks 47th among the states in the value of its mineral production. Sand and gravel, which account for two-thirds of the total output by value, are found in abundant quantities throughout the state, most often in association with glacial kames, mounds of material deposited by glacial meltwater. The second most valuable mineral is crushed stone, particularly granite, which is quarried in almost all of New Hampshire's counties. In terms of end use by value, most of the state's mineral output is used in highway and building construction. Clays are also mined and a few gemstones are collected.

For more than a century, New Hampshire has relied on manufacturing as a major source of income and employment. The state prides itself in providing a welcoming atmosphere for manufacturing. New Hampshire does not tax personal income or sales, nor does it tax the inventory and machinery of manufactures as in some states. The tax structure combined with ready access to major New England markets has encouraged many manufacturers to locate in the state.

A leading industry in terms of income generated was the manufacture of industrial machinery. Included in this sector is the making of computers and related products, bearings, and machinery for the paper industry. Another important industry is the manufacture of electronic and electrical equipment, including firms making printed circuit boards, electric lamps, and semiconductors. The manufacture of precision instruments, another high-ranking industry, includes industries making electricity-measuring devices, search and navigation devices, instruments used in surgery, and optical instruments and lenses. Other leading industries include the making of fabricated metal products; the making of rubber and plastic items; food processing; printing and publishing; and the manufacture of paper products.

Factories and mills in New Hampshire are generally small. Manufacturing centers are concentrated along the river valleys in the south, particularly in Hillsborough County. Berlin and several other milling centers in Coos County have large pulp and paper industries. The Portsmouth-Kittery Naval Shipyard, once an integral part of New Hampshire's economy, declined significantly in importance during the 1970s.

The growth in manufacturing in New Hampshire has been due largely to a big influx of firms that manufacture electrical and electronic equipment, computer software, and telecommunications equipment.

Manchester, New Hampshire's largest city, is now diversified in its industry, with factories that produce machinery and electrical and electronic products. Nearby Concord specializes in the electronics industry and printing. Nashua, the state's second largest city, has plants that manufacture machinery and telecommunications equipment. The development of computer software is also a primary activity. The area around Portsmouth and Dover has diversified its industry, which now includes the manufacture of automobile parts and high-technology equipment. Other industrial areas center on Keene, Claremont, Berlin, and Laconia

The Seabrook nuclear power plant, located south of Portsmouth, generates 53 percent of the electricity produced in New Hampshire. The state's sole nuclear facility began commercial operation in 1990. Another 30 percent of the electricity is generated in plants burning fossil fuels, primarily coal and oil. The rest comes from the 21 hydroelectric generators, at dams that have harnessed New Hampshire's rivers, and co-generation plants, which are fueled by burning wood chips.

Two state-owned hydroelectric dams near Pittsburg are leased to private power companies. They provide, in addition to power, water-storage and recreation facilities at Lake Francis. Private utility companies in both Vermont and New Hampshire operate several power dams on the Connecticut River that also help to control floods. Among these are Wilder Dam, which has created a lake for water sports, and Samuel C. Moore Dam, near Littleton, which serves the largest hydroelectric power plant in New England.

New Hampshire has been a popular resort area for summer vacationers since the late 19th century and for skiers since the 1930s. Since the 1950s improved highways and the expansion of public facilities for camping and recreation have further stimulated tourism.

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America Real Estate Directory

Official Website for the State of New Hampshire

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